Audubon News

River Herring and Shad Update and Cap Review

Please attend the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC) Hearings in Philadelphia on August 14, 2019 “River Herring and Shad Update and Cap Review” from 2:30-4:00 pm The Notary Hotel, Autograph Collection The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC) is reviewing current protections for river herring and shad and considering doubling the cap on the number of [...]

2019-08-08T09:26:05-04:00July 29th, 2019|

Strong Enforcement of the MBTA Urged

The following letter, signed by former U.S. Department of Interior Officials, urges strong enforcement of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA): The Honorable Ryan Zinke January 10, 2018 Secretary of the Interior 1849 C St., NW Washington, D.C. 20240 Dear Secretary Zinke: We are all conservation professionals who have formerly served the Department of the Interior, [...]

2018-04-03T15:47:19-04:00January 16th, 2018|

The White House Turns Its Back On America’s Birds

Originally published on the website of National Audubon WASHINGTON—“Christmas came early for bird killers. By acting to end industries’ responsibility to avoid millions of gruesome bird deaths per year, the White House is parting ways with more than 100 years of conservation legacy,” said David O’Neill, Audubon’s chief conservation officer, in response to the Trump Administration's [...]

2018-04-03T15:47:19-04:00January 8th, 2018|

News on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

Photo by Victor Benard Congress has passed a tax package that includes a provision to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling. As dispiriting as this, you should know that our fight isn’t yet over. A number of regulatory, scientific, political, and infrastructure-related hurdles must still be cleared before [...]

2018-04-03T15:47:19-04:00January 8th, 2018|

Proposed Federal Law Could Save Countless Birds From Death by Glass

Glass kills birds—that’s not news. Decades of research by ornithologist Daniel Klem estimates up to a billion avian mortalities from North American buildings each year, a number that experts say is widely shared and recognized. But despite its scope, moves to solve the problem have been comparably small and slow.

2018-04-03T15:47:19-04:00October 27th, 2017|